Black Youth Unemployment May Restrict Future Earnings

February 6, 2014 | | The Bay State Banner |

As the White House prepares to launch a major economic opportunity effort, record high unemployment among black and Latino youth underscores how essential it is to create job opportunities for young people of color.

The critical issue here is that the ages of 16 to 24 are make or break years for lifelong earning potential. With one out four blacks and 1 out of 6 Latinos under the age of 25 without work, a generation of youth of color risks falling behind.

The situation for black and Latino unemployed youths is so alarming that leading think tanks and economists are raising red flags about it at a staggering pace. One report on the topic by Demos, a public policy organization, argues that the “exclusion of young people of color” from job opportunities “weakens the promise of America.”

Why’s that?

With wealth in African-American and Latino communities already the lowest on record, a loss of income on a generational scale would likely harden existing inequities and set back economic progress in the country for decades. That’s simply because there are so many young blacks and Latinos who want work but can’t find it.

Read the report: Stuck: Young America's Persistent Jobs Crisis