In the News

After a recent presentation at Demos in New York, Simran Sethi sat down with Lester Brown to talk about his latest book "Plan B 2.0', what gold and bottled water have in common, and what we can do to help the new economy rise.

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Since writing the exposé Abramsky, now 34, relocated from New York City to Sacramento, California, and has traveled extensively through most states in the union-no less than 13 of them for his newest book, Conned: How Millions Went to Prison, Lost the Vote, and Helped Send George W. Bush to the White House (The New Press, 2006).

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We met up with Sasha to learn more about his time writing "Conned," the impact of disfranchisement and the reform measures being fought at the state level to repair our broken democracy.

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Today, parents are finding that they are on the hook for more, sometimes much more - contributions of thousands of dollars a year to help young men and women get on their feet economically, often into their 30's.

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Older Americans are finding themselves in this situation because they are simply trying to make ends meet on fixed incomes. The same Demos study showed that 40 percent of their income is spent on debt payments, including mortgage debt.

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More than a year after the 2004 general election, indictments against county workers suggest the Ohio recount was not conducted legally.

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The expectation of rising prices became a self-fulfilling prophecy as office mates and in-laws tried to leapfrog each other. The prevailing mindset: "You see people who aren't particularly talented, who aren't hard-working, who buy a house with nothing down, and they've been getting rich doing it. If they're getting richer, then you're falling behind," says Robert H. Frank, a Cornell University economist and author of Luxury Fever.

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Interview with Miles Rapoport, president of DEMOS, a group that combines research and advocacy to strengthen American democracy has recently published a book exploring this topic titled, "Inequality Matters: The Growing Economic Divide in America and Its Poisonous Consequences."

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David Callahan, the author of a book called The Cheating Culture, says: "We've passed the tipping point where cheating is so common that it's accepted as the norm.

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Advocates for the disenfranchised say that regardless of how voting restrictions change on the books, the actual impact of reform hinges on local enforcement. Civil rights groups argue that even when people are technically allowed to petition to regain voting eligibility, rigid review processes by electoral authorities along with a general lack of awareness about eligibility standards among both officials and disenfranchised people impede the full restoration of voting rights.

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