In the News

We take a look to the Supreme Court's decision overturning Vermont's campaign finance law. The 1997 law placed the nation's tightest restrictions on much candidates running for state office in Vermont could spend on elections and on how much individuals could bankroll candidates. Interview with Stuart Comstock-Gay, Executive Director of the National Voting Rights Institute.

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I can confidently say that helping the working poor meet the costs of child care and education can help them escape poverty; however I cannot say if marriage counseling classes will help couples with few resources stay married and create stable lives for their children.

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The debates continue over such admittedly worthy issues as whether the GOP's evil minions literally stole the election in Ohio from John Kerry in 2004, and if the blame for Kerry's loss was due mostly to his bungled campaign, rigged voting machines or voting suppression efforts that targeted black and low-income voters.

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For too many grads, though, "the 'debt for diploma' system" makes starting-out responsibility, financially speaking, very difficult, says Draut. The shift from free grants to loans since the early '90s has more than doubled the debt burden of grads who borrow to go to school. That's why it's important to learn to calculate for the real world so you can fulfill the high expectations that motivated you to go to college in the first place.

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But in the United States today, there's a new twist to the familiar plot. Income inequality used to be about rich versus poor, but now it's increasingly a matter of the ultra rich and everyone else.

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Draut estimates 25 cents out of every dollar earned by indebted graduates goes to pay off credit cards or loans, for a total debt load of about $20,000 per person.

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Draut, who is also the director of the New York think tank Economic Opportunity Program at Demos, suggests a social and economic agenda and says young adults need to become activists.

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Draut says it's a myth that young people are spending recklessly and racking up credit card bills on high-priced items.

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In his new book, "Conned: How Millions Went to Prison, Lost the Vote, and Helped Send George W. Bush to The White House," Abramsky takes us on a journey through disenfranchised America, detailing the revival of antidemocratic laws that came of age in the post-Civil War segregationist South, and profiling Americans who are fighting to regain the right to vote.

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The recent votes in the House of Representatives to block reauthorization of the Voting Rights Act and in the Senate to reject an increase in the Minimum Wage give powerful voice to the reason why Blacks respond by saying no to Republican candidates.

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