Commentary

Senior Fellow Nomi Prins examines the impact of insurance companies shirking their responsibilities post-Katrina, and the need for lasting reform with more federal and state supervision and fewer leniencies with reinsurance and insurance company price hikes and reneged claims.

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Cole Krawitz, communications and events associate with Demos and Jay Toole, shelter organizer for Queers for Economic Justice, discuss how de jure and de facto disenfranchisement continues to erode our democracy, particularly for low-income communities and communities of color.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Linda Tarr-Whelan calls for an attitudinal shift that celebrates and fundamentally incorporates women's decision-making power, and an end to the hidden costs of gender inequality.

Around the world smart business leaders are seeing women's equality as a new tool for economic growth. The Economist calls it "womenomics."

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky brings us the story of the shift in voters taste on the war on drugs, and the ever increasing move by Nevada conservatives in supporting making marijuana, in particular, a low priority for law enforcement.

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky discusses how Colorado's Supreme Court ruling denied parolees the right to vote the same week that the Human Rights Committee of the United Nations issued a highly critical report about how the United States treats prisoners and ex-prisoners.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Robert H. Frank discusses how with the herd now in full stampede, the era of big, gas-guzzling S.U.V.'s may soon be history.

Clearly, the herd instinct can lead us astray. For the most part, however, the impulse to emulate others serves us well. After all, without drawing on the wisdom and experience of others, it would be almost impossible to cope with the stream of complex decisions we confront.

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Senior Fellow Allison Fine illustrates how communities are pushing power to the edges through community empowerment endeavors, online strategies and more in an effort to push power out and share information — to participate, not dictate.

Our online communities will continue to grow and become an ever-larger part of our lives. Because of this, powering the edges and participating in communal efforts, whether they are geographic or virtual, is going to look and feel differently in this new century.

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Senior Fellow Rich Benjamin spotlights how Rural America deserves national attention for sacrificing a disproportionate number of its sons and daughters and the resulting impact on the economy.

Rural America has been overrepresented since the start of our all-voluntary military in 1973-1974, military experts say. And roughly 35 percent of troops who've died serving in Afghanistan and Iraq come from rural America, much higher than it's 25 percent share of the national population.

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Lone Star Iconoclast

Distinguished Senior Fellow Robert H. Frank discusses how pricing schemes enable companies to attract more buyers, reduce the average cost per buyer served, and free up resources that can be used to support higher quality — more frequent flights for travelers and more sophisticated laptops for computer buyers.

On balance, however, there appears to be at least rough justice in these and other hurdle schemes. The buyers who care most about quality tend also to be those who are least willing to jump over discount hurdles.

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Communications and Events Associate Cole Krawitz discussed the impact of restrictive voter ID requirements, and REAL ID on transgender communities. Krawitz outlines how REAL ID's implementation will result in grave consequences due to inconsistent requirements among state agencies and databases, and the far-reaching impact the legislation has on the future of our democracy.

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