In the News

Students living in President Hillary Clinton’s America could go to college debt-free, her campaign manager hinted earlier this week. 

Making college more affordable is part of Clinton’s plan to boost quality of life for ordinary Americans, Robby Mook, “Hillary for America” campaign manager, told CNBC in response to a question about which age demographic will be the toughest for Clinton to lure.

[...]

| |
Four national and state voting-rights organizations are threatening to sue North Carolina for what they contend are Gov.
Local social service agencies are not giving poor residents adequate opportunities to file and update voter registrations as required by federal law, a letter sent by a group of voting rights advocates warned the North Carolina State Board of Elections and Department of Health and Human Services.
 
Executives with Project Vote, Demos, Lawyer's Committee for Civil Rights Under Law and the Southern Coalition for Social Justice were the lead authors of the letter, which is potentially the precursor to a lawsuit if North Carolina officials don't a
| |

[...]

According to The New York Times' Paul F. Campos, tuition rates are more the victim of "the constant expansion of university administration" than state-funded budget cuts.

| |

Thanks to rapidly rising tuition costs, America has a $1.2 trillion student debt problem.

| |

[...]

The Marriage Opportunity Council argues that “no politically plausible amount of government transfers” can fill the gap necessary to curb inequality. But suggesting that two-parent, married households are remedies for inequality is suspect—15.2 million impoverished children live in two-parent, married households. Relatedly, children of married parents in the United States are way poorer than children in married households in other countries. Such statements are also too dismissive of other needed solutions.

Public colleges and universities are supposed to be affordable options for students seeking a degree, but years of state budget cuts have led to increased tuition that families are struggling to afford. If states continue down this path of disinvestment, some will soon contribute nothing to higher education and leave schools and parents to fend for themselves, according to a series of new reports.

| |

The skyrocketing price of college tuition at previously affordable state colleges and universities is a longstanding source of concern, especially for people graduating with mountains of student debt. People have many theories as to why this is happening: administrative bloat, too-high salaries for professors, or perhaps too many unnecessary new buildings.

| |