In the News

Erica Jackson has just moved into her house in Cypress with her two boys.

Despite a well-paying job, it’s the first home that the 36-year-old has been able to purchase – thanks to a counseling agency called Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America.

The group helped her to control her spending, deal with her student loan debt and save more money every month.

“I just feel stable,” Jackson said. “I feel like I’m part of the whole American Dream, you know, and responsible.”

In an op-ed in the New York Times over the weekend, University of Colorado law professor Paul F. Campos offered a provocative answer to the frequently asked question: why is college so expensive these days?

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For this week’s Feministing Five, we spoke with Heather McGhee, president of Demos, a public policy organization working for an America where all have an equal say in democracy and an equal chance in the economy.

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A recent report titled “The Racial Wealth Gap” examined, in conjunction with other factors, the role education plays in the persistent wealth gap between minorities and their White counterparts in this country.

Today probably started with a cup of coffee and perhaps an egg, a piece of fruit, or some form of breakfast meat or meat-type product. Whether you ate at home or picked up something on the way to work, you weren't just consuming calories. In selecting each item you were, intentionally or not, taking a side in the ethical wrangling and consumer activism implanted in the American food system. (...)

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At hastily planned protests in several cities, workers and labor organizers criticized the new McDonald's Corp. pay-increase plan as too little for too few.

Protesters are angry that the Oak Brook, Ill., company won't improve wages for employees at franchises, which make up 90% of McDonald's roughly 14,000 U.S. stores. Even for the 90,000 workers at company-owned stores who will see their paychecks increase to at least $1 above local hourly minimum wages starting July 1, the concession is too small, advocates said. (...)

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Life happens.  We have children to support.  We lose jobs.  Marriages fall apart.  By the time we near our ‘Golden Years’ the nest-egg we may have envisioned may be a lot smaller than we thought and in many cases, not there at all due to heavy debt loads.

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On Thursday, a day on which many New Yorkers were squinting in what seemed like the first full sunlight in months, New York Mayor de Blasio announced at Gracie Mansion that he, along with a number of other leading progressives, was putting forward a vision for how to address income inequality. Speaking first, de Blasio said that the group had come together to formulate a template for how best to conquer income inequality, which, he said, is worse  today than it was at the height of the Great Depression.

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Last week, New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer unveiled a new plan to regulate financial advisers, the first of its kind, that tries to protect the average investor from advisers who don’t have to put their clients’ best interests first.

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Wall Street wants to own your education destiny.

To the old saying about “death and taxes,” you can now add another: debt.

In fact, in contemporary America, debt is likely becoming at least as all-encompassing as the other two.

An increasingly powerful force behind the debt explosion is not what you might expect: not cars, not homes, not healthcare. It’s education. [...]

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