In the News

On Tuesday morning, for the ninth time in less than a year and half, low-wage employees working for federal contractors are going on strike.

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As we mentioned during the rollout of Paul Ryan's poverty plan last week, expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit is one of the few anti-poverty measures both parties can agree about (even if they can't come to an agreement on how to fund it).

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It's fair to say most people think of giving to charity as a good thing to do. If we have extra resources, it feels right to help people who are less fortunate.

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What if the poor need more than disposable income to escape poverty? What if they need a life coach?

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The fall out continues over whether Governor Cuomo's top aid interfered with an ethics commission probe, with some now saying that the state's Attorney General, Eric Schneiderman, could have done more to protect the integrity of the investigations, and whether any actual crimes were committed.

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Eliminating poverty seems like an impossibly utopian goal, but it's actually pretty easy: we can just give people enough money that they're above the poverty line. That idea, known as a basic income, has been around forever, but it's made a comeback in recent years.

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U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara vowed that he has the “fearlessness and independence” needed to investigate Albany corruption as Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo is accused of interfering with his own corruption commission.

“If other people aren’t going to do it, then we’re going to do it,” Bharara said on the PBS’ program “Charlie Rose."

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Following a New York Times report on the Cuomo administration's meddling with the Moreland Commission panel on public corruption, one question could prove crucial: While the governor has the legal right to involve himself in the workings of a Moreland

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Whether or not you attended the ninth annual Netroots Nation convention at Cobo Hall last weekend, you may have heard about downtown’s large demonstration against Detroit’s water shutoffs.

At this year’s Netroots Nation conference, where speakers included Democratic luminaries like Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Vice President Joe Biden, the honor of delivering the opening keynote address went to Rev. William Barber, the president of the North Carolina NAACP and the driving force behind the state’s Moral Mondays demonstrations.

If one speech captured the tenor of this year’s Netroots Nation, it was Barber’s.

“Movements never came from D.C. down,” he bellowed. “Movements always come from Birmingham up, from Montgomery up.”

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