In the News

But in the United States today, there's a new twist to the familiar plot. Income inequality used to be about rich versus poor, but now it's increasingly a matter of the ultra rich and everyone else.

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Draut estimates 25 cents out of every dollar earned by indebted graduates goes to pay off credit cards or loans, for a total debt load of about $20,000 per person.

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Draut, who is also the director of the New York think tank Economic Opportunity Program at Demos, suggests a social and economic agenda and says young adults need to become activists.

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Draut says it's a myth that young people are spending recklessly and racking up credit card bills on high-priced items.

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In his new book, "Conned: How Millions Went to Prison, Lost the Vote, and Helped Send George W. Bush to The White House," Abramsky takes us on a journey through disenfranchised America, detailing the revival of antidemocratic laws that came of age in the post-Civil War segregationist South, and profiling Americans who are fighting to regain the right to vote.

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The recent votes in the House of Representatives to block reauthorization of the Voting Rights Act and in the Senate to reject an increase in the Minimum Wage give powerful voice to the reason why Blacks respond by saying no to Republican candidates.

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Young adults apply for credit cards and run up balances. They take out car loans and sometimes even mortgages. They build credit histories and compile credit scores. But how many people in their late teens and early 20s know how to do all this borrowing wisely?

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It's a culture of expediency--a culture of shortcuts, which reminds me of a preacher I heard once, a Scottish Calvinist who warned, "There are no shortcuts; no shortcuts to heaven. Every shortcut leads to hell."

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We talk a good game here in this country about exporting democracy to other countries, but, in fact, the people are often not in control. Certainly, they weren't in Texas. As we saw in Texas, the voters don't choose politicians; the politicians choose voters through partisan gerrymandering.

The ruling "marks a lost opportunity to end the arms race for campaign cash and make elections a contest of ideas rather than dollars," said Stuart Comstock-Gay, executive director of the Boston-based National Voting Rights Institute, which helped defend the Vermont law.

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