In the News

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According to The New York Times' Paul F. Campos, tuition rates are more the victim of "the constant expansion of university administration" than state-funded budget cuts.

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The skyrocketing price of college tuition at previously affordable state colleges and universities is a longstanding source of concern, especially for people graduating with mountains of student debt. People have many theories as to why this is happening: administrative bloat, too-high salaries for professors, or perhaps too many unnecessary new buildings.

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As the glow of finally deciding on a college begins to wear off, many students and families must wrestle with how they’re going to pay for school. 

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Public university students today pay $3,000 more in annual tuition than their counterparts a decade ago. 

Why that is depends on whom you ask. Some pundits like to blame administrative bloat or the construction boom. Within higher education, many cite the decline in state support.

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“[P]ublic higher education in this country no longer exists,” writes Hiltonsmith. “Because more than half of core educational expenses at ‘public’ 4-year universities are now funded through tuition, a private source of capital, they have effectively become subsidized private institutions.”

While higher education spending used to fluctuate with the economy and tanked during the recession, it has not rebounded as the economy regains strength.

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Blow into a dog whistle, and most people won’t hear a thing. But dogs do. And they come running. That’s how strategic, coded racism works, writes law professor Ian Haney López, in Dog Whistle Politics: How Coded Racial Appeals Have Reinvented Racism and Wrecked the Middle Class.

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So far, advocates have yet to coalesce around a detailed policy for debt-free college. The congressional resolutions are general statements of principle rather than detailed legislation.

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A Supreme Court that has given the green light to unlimited spending in political campaigns ruled Wednesday that judicial candidates don't always have the same right to solicit contributions as other politicians.

The justices ruled 5-4 that Florida's judicial code of conduct can ban candidates from asking for donations. As a result, in 30 states that elect state and local judges, restrictions on fundraising by judicial candidates can remain in place.

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Millions of working people across the country face the frightening prospect of aging into poverty rather than retiring with dignity.

The lack of retirement security for middle-class and low-wage workers is a growing crisis that Washington has refused to address, even though it demands immediate attention.

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