In the News

“Super PACs likely encouraged more candidates to get into the 2016 GOP presidential race,” said Jay Goodliffe, a political science professor at Brigham Young University. “Even if their polls were not initially good, or there were other setbacks, the super PAC could help keep them afloat.”

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Amy Traub, senior policy analyst at Demos, a New York-based nonpartisan public policy research organization, told Bloomberg BNA Jan. 20: ‘‘It’s really striking the way the growing protests we’ve seen by Wal-Mart workers, and increasing public pressure, has really pushed the world’s largest employer to raise wages and improve [work] schedules. It’s a huge victory for Wal-Mart workers [and] will ultimately benefit the company itself as employees have increased buying power.’’

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Bloomberg BNA
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That’s one of several proposals the Republican presidential candidate laid out Monday to make college more affordable.

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 The explosion of “dark money” spent in the political system in the United States threatens racial equity in the United States making it harder for Blacks and other minorities to gain a foothold in the middle class and fully participate in the democracy, according to a recent report by Demos, a public policy group.

(And, make no mistake, the public-sector unions are only the thin edge of the wedge seeking to bust this country into being a right-to-work nation. This is the exact game plan followed in Wisconsin by Scott Walker, who strategically went after public-sector unions first before signing a right-to-work law that he swore while campaigning that he wasn't even considering.

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Now, yes, if those fees produced greater and more reliable returns, they would be worth it. But they don’t. They are only enriching the financial services sector at the expense of your own bottom line. Robert Hiltonsmith, a researcher at the think tank Demos, has estimated that the average household loses $155,000 in potential gains as a result of unnecessary fees.
 
Most of us don’t need a complicated, elaborately planned investment scheme that requires more choices and frequent changes. As the cliché goes, don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.
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Heather McGhee, the president of the leftist think tank Demos, kicked off the proceedings. “You ain’t seen nothing yet from the Working Families Party,” she said. “We’re electing leaders, we’re winning on issues, and most importantly, we’re changing what’s politically possible.”

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“We’ve already had a lot of states use student debt relief as a carrot to entering certain professions,” said Mark Huelsman, a senior policy analyst at Demos, a left-leaning think tank. “Now that most professions have student debtors in them you’re going to see broad-based relief plans,” like New York’s, he said.
 
New York’s is it’s linked specifically to income, so anyone making a relatively low salary — whether it’s an artist working out of a loft space in Bushwick or a nonprofit researcher toiling away in midtown — qualifies.
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The last person I’d expect to offer optimism and advice about Americans and retirement is Teresa Ghilarducci, the fiery economics professor at the New School for Social Research. And yet, that’s exactly what she does in her new, friendly, slim book, How to Retire With Enough Money and How to Know What Enough Is: A Clear Answer in 116 Pages.  I recommend it.

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America could elect its first woman president next year, but even that would be a hollow sign of progress in a country mired in gender inequity.
 
The Supreme Court may well gut Roe v. Wade. Access to abortion and contraception has regressed dramatically, and clinics face increasing intimidation. The pay gap is stubbornly broad.
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