Commentary

Yesterday, stock and bond markets dipped on the news that Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said that “equity market valuations at this point generally are quite high.” She further noted, “There are potential dangers there.”

She did not go so far as to say that she saw any market bubble. That would be akin to admitting that something drastic – and well, more immediate – would be required to address said bubble. Instead, she said, “The risks to financial stability are moderate, not elevated at this time.“

As the 2016 election approaches, the debate among the intelligentsia appears like it will center around the question of inequality. While income is distributed unequally in the country, what few people know is how much more unequally wealth, financial assets and inheritances are distributed. 

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Albany decision-makers face all kinds of powerful opposition. Almost invariably that opposition appears in modern garb, in the form of lobbyists, political action committees, unions, corporations, trade associations. They are fueled by money, lots of it.

On rare occasion, opposition appears as a genuine popular revolt. 

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On Mother’s Day 2013, the New York City Police Department told 911 operators, most of whom  are women, that  they would have to work overtime that day.

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In the wake of the recent gutting of the Voting Rights Act, partisans were quick to jump on the opportunity to restrict unfavorable voters. Across the country, conservatives in particular have debated fiercely whether to pursue voter suppression to remain competitive in an increasingly diverse electorate.

When discussing race, the conservative argument is best expressed by the famous words of Chief Justice John Roberts: "The best way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race." Translation: America has done bad things in its history, but those bad things are gone now, so we should move past those horrors and look forward.

President Obama's recent comments on universal voting have spurred a debate about how such a policy would influence elections. On the Monkey Cage blog, John Sides examines the partisan consequences and argues that turnout would generally benefit Democrats, but that the effect would be modest.

Economists, policy wonks, and politicians of both persuasions agree that middle class income stagnation, and the inequality that it causes, is the principal economic challenge for the nation. U.S. inequality has been on the rise for more than 30 years, and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimates that it has reduced U.S. economic growth more than even the financial crash. This cost is still accruing.

Black Twitter is a force. It’s also not particularly well understood by those who aren’t a part of it. The term is used to describe a large network of black Twitter users and their loosely coordinated interactions, many of which accumulate into trending topics due to the network’s size, interconnectedness, and unique activity.

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