Commentary

Senior Fellow David Callahan looks at why conservatives are winning public policy battles at the state level and how progressives can do better in this arena.

Despite the proven track record of statewide coalitions in promoting reform policies, many foundations remain skittish about these groups; and the coalitions have yet to become adept at raising significant money from other sources. Unsurprisingly, the strength of statewide coalitions varies widely.

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If nothing else, the 2000 election mess has begun to produce real political engagement and debate about democracy. For some this debate will focus narrowly on improving election equipment and modernizing election administration. Conservatives may even try to turn the debate to one that restricts voting opportunities under the guise of efficiency, racial neutrality, and eliminating fraud. But for progressives, this is a moment to expand the debate into one about making democracy as inclusive and vibrant as possible.

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Senior Fellow David Callahan argues that the rich mainly benefitted from the economic boom.

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Seven months after 9/11 the question that still seems to vex most Americans - tough media pundits and seasoned Washington hands no less than ordinary people in the streets -- is 'why do they hate us?' Friends and adversaries alike may protest 'we don't hate you, we just don't love you as much as you'd like to be loved.' And it is true, we Americans are delicate imperialists, sensitive warriors who want our goodwill to be affirmed even as we engage actively in what looks to others very much like global military and economic hegemony.

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