Commentary

Senior Fellow George Packer explores the possibilities for building democracy in postwar Iraq.

Yet perhaps the greatest mistake made by the architects of the war was to assume that their vision of a liberal state would be eagerly embraced by an ethnically divided, overwhelmingly Islamic country with a long history of dictatorship.

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Senior Fellow David Callahan explores who gets what in Colorado politics during an era of Republican ascendancy and economic inequality.

It's true that economic and political inequality are self-reinforcing trends that have helped to lock in power for the wealthy. But that's only part of the story. These two trends have had the most impact in places most affected by another big shift of the past decade: rising conservative activism.

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Demos President Miles Rapoport and Senior Fellow David Smith argue that the best way to address growing economic inequality is with wider political participation.

Our system is entrenching inequality rather than promoting broad upward mobility. As this series of articles has shown, economic and political inequality are mutually reinforcing. So what can we do to reverse this vicious cycle?

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Senior Fellow Nomi Prins explains why it is so difficult to bring to justice leading wrongdoers in the recent corporate scandals.

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Senior Fellow Nomi Prins argues that Washington needs to do more to ensure that seniors are secure in their retirement.

It's a scary world if you want to live a long life. All three forms of retirement benefits are under attack: Social Security, Medicare and private pension plans. Either they're bombarded by rumors of eventual depletion or undergoing enormous restructuring.

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EOP Director Tamara Draut explains how billions of dollars are being taken from the wallets of ordinary Americans through practices that were once considered usury and illegal.

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Senior Fellow David Callahan explains why the corporate scandals of recent years have done little to debunk the myth that Wall Street is geared toward ordinary investors.

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Senior Fellow Nomi Prins delves into the shady accounting of major U.S. defense contractors operating in Iraq.

Although the amount of public money circling Iraq is staggering, there is no way to even trace it. Therefore, whether it's being spent wisely and methodically, whether projected revenues are on target or realistic, and whether cash is leaking out around the edges remain a total mystery.

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Senior Fellow David Callahan shows why most of the recent corporate wrongdoers are likely to walk free because of weak laws and even weaker law enforcement agencies.

The failure of our legal system to ensure accountability for corporate abuses that cost investors so dearly sends a terrible message: Ordinary Americans are being reminded once again that the rich live by a different set of rules, while would-be corporate criminals are seeing that crime pays.

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NEW YORK -- Nine months after the federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) -- whose passage was sparked by the disputed 2000 presidential vote -- became law, the action on election reform has shifted to the state level. State governments are now charged with implementing the legislation, and while that poses the danger that some states will take the opportunity to cook up new methods for voter suppression, it also offers election reform advocates the best chance in a long time to improve the way America votes.

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