Commentary

With college costs running as high as $40,000 a year, House and Senate education committees have tuition control on their to-do lists.
 
"There are long-term financial implications for people starting out their lives with high debt levels," explained Tamara Draut, director of economic opportunity research at the Demos consultancy in New York.
 
Student loan obligations "limit career choices as well as people's ability to plan for retirement," said

Senior Fellow Jennifer Wheary writes that, as we come to the end of what will surely be known as a banner year for "moral values," it seems only appropriate to reflect on the place of religion in American politics and daily practice.

|

NEW YORK -- We take great pleasure in answering the communication below from Miss Virginia O'Hanlon, a third-grade student from lower Manhattan.

I am eight years old.
Some of my friends say there is no Santa.
Please tell me the truth, is there a Santa Claus?

|

Democracy Program Director Steve Carbo discusses the truth about vote suppression and system failures in communities of color.

The tactics are more subtle than in the old days, but suppression of votes in minority neighborhoods is very much alive and well.

|

President Miles Rapoport highlights how the 2004 election confounded those who have blamed the flaws in our democracy on apathetic voters, apolitical young people, and a generalized culture of disengagement.

|

Senior Fellow Rich Benjamin says that Bernard Kerik's 'nanny problem' highlights the issues of underpaid childcare providers and exploited immigrant labor.

Since one-third of American families with young children earn less than $25,000, it does not take a Nobel Laureate in mathematics to figure out that child care has become prohibitively expensive for many working families. The cost of child care has been rising at about 3 percent to 8 percent annually for several years, outpacing overall inflation.

|

Senior Fellow David Callahan suggests that the steroid scandal in sports points to such deeper problems in American society as economic inequality and Social Darwinism.

One big reason for more cheating today is that we live in an age of vast income gaps, where the carrots for winners are bigger than ever.

|

The problem for the administration, already clear from the cries of "hypocrisy!" with which his "freedom strategy" is being met in some quarters, is that there is a startling gap between the president's welcome rhetoric about democracy and a policy that allows for unilateral invasion of other countries when the U.S. feels threatened, whether or not it has actually been attacked. It is this tension between democratization and preventive war that is at issue in Iraq.

|

President Miles Rapoport writes how in the last day of the election season, he is highlighting the positive aspects that are contributing to a foundation for a new reform agenda.

|

Senior Fellow Nomi Prins argues that real reform of the banking industry is unlikely to occur no matters who wins the 2004 election.

|