Commentary

Democratic candidates John Kerry and John Edwards clearly aspire to recapture the moral high ground from Republicans, and they have spoken about values at nearly every campaign stop.

Meanwhile, President Bush and the GOP have done everything they can to maintain the advantage on moral issues that Republicans have held since the Reagan presidency.

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Senior Fellow Nomi Prins explains the role of Wall Street traders and institutions in driving up oil prices.

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The Federal Reserve just announced the second interest rate hike in two months, and households across the nation are bracing for impact. More than 50 million adults are in credit card debt, an economic problem that causes stress and, at its worst, financial ruin. It helped drive the refinancing boom, as families cashed out equity at record levels. Most people would be stunned to learn that more children will now suffer through their parents' bankruptcy than their parents' divorce. The rise in household debt spells trouble for our families and the economy.

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I have never cast a vote. Not that I haven't wanted to.

I was sent to prison on a felony conviction at 16. When I got out at 19 it was Eisenhower's last year in office, and I was old enough to go to the polls. I should have been able to cast my first vote that year in the Nixon-Kennedy race. Voting for president in 1960, that's a memory I should have today. It's a right I should have had then.

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An increasing number of older Americans find themselves deep in credit card debt or even filing for bankruptcy.

Senior Fellow George Packer explores how the Iraq war has always been a war about big ideas — including some very bad ideas.

Only two serious, and competing, versions of the Iraq war's meaning are left standing: one, that this is a war against tyranny and for democracy; the other, that this is a war of American domination. It's about liberalism, or it's about imperialism.

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NEW YORK -- On May 20, 1993, President Clinton signed the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) -- the aptly nicknamed "Motor Voter" Law -- as a landmark step forward in making our voting process more accessible to all citizens. Eleven years later, and just months before a national election, it is high time for officials charged with its implementation to help the law truly achieve its potential.

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NEW YORK - Sixty years ago, Congress enacted legislation that would transform the nation's social and economic landscape in ways unimaginable at the time. On June 22, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law the Servicemen's Readjustment Act, commonly known as the GI Bill. Now , the GI bill remains exceptional not only for the massive expansion of middle-class America that it spurred, but also for reasons less obvious and less celebrated.

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Senior Fellow George Packer explores the possibilities for building democracy in postwar Iraq.

Yet perhaps the greatest mistake made by the architects of the war was to assume that their vision of a liberal state would be eagerly embraced by an ethnically divided, overwhelmingly Islamic country with a long history of dictatorship.

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Senior Fellow David Callahan explores who gets what in Colorado politics during an era of Republican ascendancy and economic inequality.

It's true that economic and political inequality are self-reinforcing trends that have helped to lock in power for the wealthy. But that's only part of the story. These two trends have had the most impact in places most affected by another big shift of the past decade: rising conservative activism.

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