Commentary

The problem for the administration, already clear from the cries of "hypocrisy!" with which his "freedom strategy" is being met in some quarters, is that there is a startling gap between the president's welcome rhetoric about democracy and a policy that allows for unilateral invasion of other countries when the U.S. feels threatened, whether or not it has actually been attacked. It is this tension between democratization and preventive war that is at issue in Iraq.

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President Miles Rapoport writes how in the last day of the election season, he is highlighting the positive aspects that are contributing to a foundation for a new reform agenda.

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Senior Fellow Nomi Prins argues that real reform of the banking industry is unlikely to occur no matters who wins the 2004 election.

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Senior Fellow Nomi Prins on how runaway fraud and corruption are costing jobs, pensions and the future prosperity of the middle class.

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The word "values" has moved to center stage again this election year. Democratic candidates John Kerry and John Edwards clearly aspire to recapture the moral high ground from Republicans, and they have spoken about values at nearly every campaign stop. Meanwhile, President Bush and the GOP have done everything they can to maintain the Republican advantage on moral issues that they have held since the Reagan presidency.

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NEW YORK -- Trying to stir up images of the 1960s freedom rides, MTV's bipartisan Rock the Vote Bus Tour to galvanize young voters rolled into Chicago last weekend, complete with politicians, community leaders and, of course, celebrities and corporate sponsors.

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NEW YORK -- Trying to stir up images of the 1960s freedom rides, MTV's bipartisan Rock the Vote Bus Tour to galvanize young voters rolled into Chicago last weekend, complete with politicians, community leaders and, of course, celebrities and corporate sponsors.

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Senior Fellow David Callahan argues that bottom-line pressures in the workplace, along with weak regulation, often lead to unethical behavior.

The concept of the "fraud triangle" occupies a central place in our understanding of how and why fraud occurs. The triangle conjures up a slippery slope that is greased by a combination of opportunity, personal financial pressures, and rationalization. For forensic accountants and other watchdogs, it offers a simple guide to the basic logic of fraud in organizations.

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How is Mexico Building Political Ties with its Diaspora

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Senior Fellow David Callahan explains why President Bush — like many politicians from both parties — underestimates the obstacles to creating a nation of wealth holders.

It is easy to believe that an ownership society is just around the corner. Nearly 70 percent of households own their home, the US Census Bureau reports, a historic high. And some 50 percent of households own stock, a huge increase from two decades ago. These statistics, however, tell only part of a largely unhappy story about wealth and ownership trends in America.

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