Commentary

In her latest book, Jacked, Senior Fellow Nomi Prins demonstrates how health care in the US has gotten so bad that even the wealthy find themselves gasping at the soaring premiums.

What do a successful ABC television producer, an ex-Los Angeles Laker turned actor, and a former meth addict turned PR god all have in common? First, they all spend way too much time in LA traffic. Second, they all think America's current health-care system sucks.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Robert Kuttner outlines the prospects for Congress' return before the election season kicks into full gear, and quite possibly, Republicans lose their majority in at least one House.

The jockeying is likely to be fierce before the election, and even more intense afterward if Republicans, as expected, lose seats. Ironically, the bigger the Republicans' election loss and more sweeping the repudiation, the more desperate will be lame ducks' last hurrah.

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky gives us a breathtaking overview of how except for a rudimentary federal framework (which determines the voting age, channels money to states and counties, and enforces protections for minorities and the disabled), U.S. elections are shaped by a dizzying mélange of inconsistently enforced laws, conflicting court rulings, local traditions, various technology choices, and partisan trickery.

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky details a speech given by Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson critiquing the Bush Administration in which Anderson declared, quoting Teddy Roosevelt, that silence in the face of injustice "is morally treasonable to the American public."

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Spencer Overton is a professor of law at George Washington University specializing in voting rights and campaign finance law. This is the introduction to his book, "Stealing Democracy".

Most people have a relatively simple understanding of American democracy. Each person has a right called a "vote." A person casts the vote for a candidate. The candidates who receive the most votes win and make laws. Candidates win by supporting popular policies. "Free" citizens thus govern themselves.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Robert H. Frank discusses that as today's disparities in inequality are once more at record levels, it may be no surprise that there is a resurgence of interest in Gatsby.

When "The Great Gatsby" was first published in 1925, income and wealth disparities were at record levels. It is thus no mystery that F. Scott Fitzgerald's tale of wealthy Americans during the Jazz Age became an instant best seller.

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Senior Fellow Nomi Prins examines the impact of insurance companies shirking their responsibilities post-Katrina, and the need for lasting reform with more federal and state supervision and fewer leniencies with reinsurance and insurance company price hikes and reneged claims.

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Cole Krawitz, communications and events associate with Demos and Jay Toole, shelter organizer for Queers for Economic Justice, discuss how de jure and de facto disenfranchisement continues to erode our democracy, particularly for low-income communities and communities of color.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Linda Tarr-Whelan calls for an attitudinal shift that celebrates and fundamentally incorporates women's decision-making power, and an end to the hidden costs of gender inequality.

Around the world smart business leaders are seeing women's equality as a new tool for economic growth. The Economist calls it "womenomics."

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky brings us the story of the shift in voters taste on the war on drugs, and the ever increasing move by Nevada conservatives in supporting making marijuana, in particular, a low priority for law enforcement.

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