Commentary

Senior Fellow Jonathan Cohn argues that with 90 percent of Americans in their 20s having sex, according to the available statistics, it seems that quite the opposite is true — that only a very small minority of the population disapproves of unmarried twentysomethings having sex. The conservative view, in other words, is a very extreme one.

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The New Republic

Senior Fellow Allison Fine discusses how the cornerstone of the Connected Age is a shift in power from institutions to individuals. The ability to communicate one to many now rests in the hands of people effectively using social media tools such as YouTube, MySpace and Facebook.

If posting Internet videos is free, if any candidate can create and share a 30-second ad or documentary at virtually no cost, this could well mark the end of broadcast media's rule and mean the end of egregious campaign spending, no laws necessary.

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NVRI Attorney Lisa Danetz highlights how a decade after the passage of the National Voter Registration Act, battles are being re-fought in less public view around implementation of voter registration in public assistance offices throughout the country. For whatever reason, many states are no longer offering voter registration opportunities at their public assistance offices. And, when made aware of the problem, different states are again reacting differently.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Robert Kuttner outlines that the real fraud is the theft of our democracy, by deliberate suppression of the right to vote and to have one's vote counted. The popular revulsion against the Bush administration is so powerful that even with these abuses, Democrats are likely to take back the House. Then the recovery of American democracy can begin.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow clarifies that, in a nutshell, happiness and welfare, though related, are very different things. For example, growth enables us to expand medical research and other activities that clearly enhance human welfare but have little effect on measured happiness levels.

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Tamara Draut and Barbara Ehrenreich offer insight and analysis into the economic struggles of the middle class. Ehrenreich is the author of thirteen books, including the New York Times bestseller Nickel and Dimed.

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Tamara Draut, Director of the Economic Opportunity Program and Jose A. Garcia, Senior Research and Policy Associate of the Economic Opportunity Program discusses how not everyone had a respite during the summer vacation months, nor will they as we approach the winter holidays. While millions took to the roads and skies this summer, many just kept working. Not because they wanted to, but because paid "vacation time" in America is a perk, not a part of the social contract.

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Boston Globe

Distinguished Senior Fellow Robert Kuttner outlines how a special exhibition, American Democracy in the Bush Years, would feature material on Ken Blackwell and Katherine Harris, with displays of flawed or manipulated voting machines, purged voter lists, excessive ID checks, rubber-stamp courts, and suspensions of civil liberties.

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Doctors join South Dakota's effort to ban abortion

Senior Fellow Jonathan Cohn discusses how an advertisement in South Dakota by doctors against abortion are pediatric sub-specialists, the kind who spend most of their time treating children with severe congenital health problems, and while they are entitled to their opinion, they should be clear that it's just that — an opinion — rather than objective scientific fact.

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The New Republic

Economic Opportunity Director Tamara Draut writes with Barbara Ehrenreich writes how the middle class has been roiled in recent years by what the economists call "income volatility," or sudden changes in fortune, usually caused by layoffs. The discarded shrink off in shame — after all, they must have done something wrong — and vanish from the unemployment statistics by going to Circuit City or Starbucks and taking whatever job they can get.

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