Commentary

Demos President Miles Rapoport comments on the November 2006 election as a fundamental moment for deciding the future of our country.

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky discusses how today, one in four black men throughout much of the South is unable to vote, and a high percentage of poverty-level Anglos and Latinos are also disenfranchised. The result: The electorate is shrunken, and as it shrinks, election results do not reflect the full will or needs of the population.

On Election Day, 5.3 million American adults will be needlessly forced to stay away from the polls by their state governments. The reason: At some point, they were convicted of a felony.

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Star-Telegram

Director of the Democracy Program Stuart Comstock-Gay highlights that there are simply too many potential snafus preventing all votes from being accurately counted. Recounts should be considered not just to ensure the most accurate vote count, but as a critical means of exposing problems with our electoral process, and to create a climate for continued reform and improvements.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Robert Kuttner muses that November 2006 will be remembered either as the time American democracy was stolen again, maybe forever, or began a brighter day.

First, unless there are levels of theft and fraud that would truly mean the end of American democracy, a Democratic House seems as close to a sure thing as we ever get in American politics three days before an election.

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Senior Fellow Allison Fine describes how the advent of the Connected Age and social media are providing women with opportunity and advantage that gives Year of the Woman 2.0 a new dimension.

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Senior Fellow Jonathan Cohn argues that with 90 percent of Americans in their 20s having sex, according to the available statistics, it seems that quite the opposite is true — that only a very small minority of the population disapproves of unmarried twentysomethings having sex. The conservative view, in other words, is a very extreme one.

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The New Republic

Senior Fellow Allison Fine discusses how the cornerstone of the Connected Age is a shift in power from institutions to individuals. The ability to communicate one to many now rests in the hands of people effectively using social media tools such as YouTube, MySpace and Facebook.

If posting Internet videos is free, if any candidate can create and share a 30-second ad or documentary at virtually no cost, this could well mark the end of broadcast media's rule and mean the end of egregious campaign spending, no laws necessary.

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NVRI Attorney Lisa Danetz highlights how a decade after the passage of the National Voter Registration Act, battles are being re-fought in less public view around implementation of voter registration in public assistance offices throughout the country. For whatever reason, many states are no longer offering voter registration opportunities at their public assistance offices. And, when made aware of the problem, different states are again reacting differently.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Robert Kuttner outlines that the real fraud is the theft of our democracy, by deliberate suppression of the right to vote and to have one's vote counted. The popular revulsion against the Bush administration is so powerful that even with these abuses, Democrats are likely to take back the House. Then the recovery of American democracy can begin.

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Distinguished Senior Fellow clarifies that, in a nutshell, happiness and welfare, though related, are very different things. For example, growth enables us to expand medical research and other activities that clearly enhance human welfare but have little effect on measured happiness levels.

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