Commentary

Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky suggests that our strongest cultural passions are reserved for sporting events and reality television. In this piece he states that, "Football riots have a way of making headlines. Now if only classical music riots still did the same."

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Robert Kuttner is a Demos Distinguished Senior Fellow and co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect. Here he writes about trade policy.

Collisions are imminent over fast-track trade authority, labor standards, and tarrifs. It's the president vs. China vs. Democrats vs. Democrats.

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky writes about the War on Drugs" and the ways in which it has blurred the lines between "hard" and "soft" drugs.

No one seems bothered that David Cameron smoked pot. But a US congressman says it's just as bad as smoking crack.

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky remarks on issues of hunger and poverty in the United States with a particular focus on Sacramento California.

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Senior Fellow Jonathan Cohn writes about the ban on gay marriage in the state of Michigan, and comments on the consequences of such a decision on communities as well as the Republican Party.

Even before last week's decision, same-sex couples throughout the state were saying they might have to leave if the courts invalidated spousal benefits.

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky comments on California's state prison system, suggesting that the state's 'three strikes' laws are "filling the state's prisons to overflowing and leaving a trail of human misery."

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Benjamin R. Barber comments on Dinesh D'Souza's new book "The Enemy at Home"

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Distinguished Senior Fellow Benjamin R. Barber writes about how the hyped up Democratic horse race is distracting from real issues and new ideas.

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Senior Fellow Robert Kuttner considers the role of Ralph Nader in the 2000 election, and the portrayal of Nader in the independent film titled "An Unreasonable Man."

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Senior Fellow Sasha Abramsky writes that "Norman Mailer, Orson Welles and the Beatles are mysteries to many of America's undergraduates" and suggests that it is a sign of a narrowing culture.

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