Commentary

Are we in a financial crisis because of too much regulation — or not enough? At bottom, three kinds of abuses led to the current crisis, while President Bush's regulators stood idly by.

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Yes, the financial regulation system needs overhaul, but the proposed plan is a Band-Aid for Wall Street's mortal wounds

Here's how to think about the proposed reform of financial oversight unveiled by Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson on Monday: The Federal Reserve Bank, whose job already includes regulating a large component of the financial system, has failed pretty badly at its tasks. The proposed solution-to give it more responsibility-seems ridiculous and hazardous.

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Obama's Cooper Union speech presages an FDR-like approach to our faltering economy. Why can't Paul Krugman see that?

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Alvadore, like many dilapidated towns in modern-day America, is at the wrong end of an array of economic changes-from globalization to higher energy costs-and many of its citizens are falling through the social safety net. The result: increased hunger.

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The next chief executive will face an economic crisis unlike any since 1933. And either Democrat will need to break radically with the elite consensus.

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Why is the tax code so impenetrable? It's all those tax breaks for the rich.

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Sometimes progress is measured by half-court movements.

When I was in school, girls played basketball by different rules from the boys. We played on a half court and could only dribble three times before passing it. Girls were regarded as too fragile to run the distance. Now, tell that to the women in the WNBA.

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San Angelo Standard-Times

The application of business principles to the world of civil society and social change has fashion, wealth, power and celebrity behind it. But where is the evidence that "philanthrocapitalism" works?

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Robert Kuttner is a Distinguished Senior Fellow at Demos and co-editor at The American Prospect. Here he writes, "the current demise of the subprime mortgage industry is deregulation's latest gift."

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Improving the economic horizons of America's young adults will require a sustained commitment and serious resources. But it will pay huge dividends.

Social investment has not kept up with changing social realities, and the remnant of America's welfare state is tilted toward the other end of the age spectrum. The solution is not, as some have suggested, to remove supports from the elderly. Reliable pensions and Medicare are also on the defensive. The remedy is to enlarge social investment for the young, to expand economic pathways to secure adulthood.

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