Commentary

Next week, Washington, D.C.’s municipal government will vote on new legislation that, if enacted, would guarantee people working in the District up to 11 weeks of paid leave to care for a new baby or child. But this is just the latest in a string of state and local governments taking action to address the needs of working parents and their families.[...]

| |

[...] By now, it’s a cliché in American politics that Latinos are a political force to be reckoned with, and that the nation’s rising Latino population will reshape the country’s politics for decades to come.

| |

Money’s influence is a perennial concern in American politics.

| |

[...]As the next CEO of America, Mr. Trump can turn his promise into policy. In his first 100 days in the Oval Office, Mr. Trump should sign an executive order to make sure that the $1.3 trillion in taxpayer-dollars our Government spends annually rewards corporations that create "more jobs and better wages" for Americans.

| |

This election Democrats blew their populist message with the working class. Many are calling for the Party to focus an economic message that prioritizes the interests of rural working class whites. They say it should not cater agendas to women, people of color and other groups. Calls to propel a vision to uplift economically distressed voters through a color-blind lens is misguided. It’s the wrong lessons to learn from this election.

| |

President-elect Donald Trump has made it clear that he wants to repeal President Barack Obama’s signature climate policies—the Clean Power Plan and the Paris Agreement on global emissions reductions. If he is successful, we will need a Plan B that the Republicans cannot obstruct. That means turning to states and cities, and in a big way.

| |

What’s up with working-class whites? It’s a question that’s been asked for decades, and has been raised again recently in the discussion surrounding an Alec MacGillis piece examining Matt Bevin’s recent election gubernatorial win in Kentucky, which could leave many in Kentucky without Medicaid.

| |

Imagine a rich person. For most Americans, the image that comes to mind is a wealthy white man. While white men certainly make up a disproportionate share of the wealthy, there is growing diversity among the wealthiest members of society. Given the increasing political salience of racial justice and gender equity, this diversity could have impacts on policy. I find that there are indeed large differences between rich men and rich women (defining that group as those earning more than $150,000 a year), as well as between rich white people and rich people of color.

| |

Resentment won this election. It was a middle-finger, throw-caution-to-the-wind, damn-the-consequences vote — cast overwhelmingly by white people.

Only white people had the luxury and the safety to ignore Trump’s promises to restore law and order, to deport millions of immigrants and to endanger Americans who practice the world’s second most popular religion. His phony economic populism was the icing on the cake — the cherry on top of the dog-whistle sundae. It was not the driving motivation behind Trump voters.

| |

The election of Donald Trump has Democrats asking themselves why they lost and where they go next as a party. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Tamara Draut of the group Demos and Rep. Xavier Becerra, a Democrat from California.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: