Commentary

Today, with health coverage for maternity care threatened, child care costs outstripping the price of college tuition, and  nearly a quarter of new mothers forced to return to work two weeks or less after giving birth, we are making it extraordinarily difficult for anyone but the ve

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For a basic income to work for working-class communities and communities of color, which have long had disproportionately little power, it needs to redistribute wealth and power.

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The Boston Review
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Our analysis shows Trump accelerated a realignment in the electorate around racism, across several different measures of racial animus—and that it helped him win. By contrast, we found little evidence to suggest individual economic distress benefited Trump. [...]

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Here, we offer new data to show that shifts in which racial groups went to the polls may have made the difference.

Neither party has been immune from the toxic pull of big money because this is now the system. To win a congressional seat or the presidency means pitching a platform that can turn on the spigot of cash from the rich and powerful seeking to influence the policy decisions and governance of each candidate they help turn into an elected official.

From the chambers of the House Financial Services Committee, we hear that consumers are losing “econom

There is a hopeful lesson from O’Reilly’s comeuppance: the right mix of political and legal action, investigative journalism, and business scorn can deliver even the most powerful tyrant a stinging rebuke. O’Reilly and the former Fox C.E.O. Roger Ailes might be out the door because of the harassment charges levelled against them, but that leaves their angry network intact, still as comfortable as ever to crap on the environment, women, immigrants, black people, transgender people, scientific research, and anything smacking of progress.

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This past Saturday, in cities across our nation, Americans rose up around the issue that brought our founding fathers to their feet and began a revolution: taxes.

Ever since Donald Trump barnstormed across the country, beating out over a dozen other Republicans for the presidential nomination, political pundits and journalists have described his campaign and ultimate win as a “populist insurgency.” There is no doubt his rhetoric often seemed populist.

Elections are decided by who votes — and increasingly, in America, by who cannot. Barriers to voting participation skew policy outcomes and elections to the right in the United States. One of the most racially discriminatory of these barriers is felon disenfranchisement.