Young Adults

For many young people, summer is an opportunity to gain much needed job experience and a steady paycheck. Seasonal hiring in the industries where young people are most likely to work—like leisure and hospitality—should mean that even in a period of slow job growth people with less job experience...
06/11/2013
Blog
Workers ages 25 to 34 fared much better last month than their younger associates.  The unemployment rate for 25 to 34-year-olds dropped to 7.2 percent in May, its lowest point since November of 2008. At the same time, labor force participation held steady, moving up to 81.3 percent. ...
06/11/2013
Data Byte
The big employment losses among people ages 20 to 24 are masked in the unemployment rate for the cohort, which barely ticked up to 13.2 percent.  Since unemployment rates only capture those people who are employed or actively looking for a job, the numbers are influenced not just by hiring and...
06/11/2013
Data Byte
Demos Policy Analyst Catherine Ruetschlin goes on the libertarian talk radio show The Peter Schiff Show to debate the benefits of raising the minimum wage. Ruetschlin is most recently the author of Stuck: Young America's Persistent Jobs Crisis where one of the policy recommendations made to remedy...
04/15/2013
Video
By now, young people are well-aware of their prospects: when the labor force shrank by almost half a million workers last month, more than two-thirds of those who left were under age 35. Maybe they knew what was coming, since employment for 20 to 34-year-olds fell by 117,000 jobs in March—greater...
04/08/2013
Data Byte
The decline in labor force participation pushed the unemployment rate for 25 to 34-year-olds down to 7.4 percent—lower than the national average. But 20 to 24-year-olds didn’t even get this statistical advantage. Even though they lost workers from the market in March, they lost plenty of jobs too,...
04/08/2013
Data Byte
In March of 2012, young workers age 20 to 24 stopped looking for work and dropped out of the labor market at a higher rate than any other group. The trajectory was especially poor for young women, who shouldered the entirety of employment losses among 20 to 24-year-olds and suffered a bigger...
04/09/2012
Data Byte
The unemployment rate for workers 25 to 34 declined to 8.6 percent in March even as more workers entered the market. Men and women shared the gains nearly equally -- of the 85,000 additional employed workers in the 25 to 34-year-old category, 40,000 were female. For more on young adult unemployment...
04/09/2012
Data Byte
Young adults can ill-afford expensive medical costs. As they wipe out savings, young people turn to credit cards to pay their medical bills.
11/03/2011
Data Byte
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