Values & Politics

Recently Demos, a New York City based think tank, issued a "briefing paper" titled How Widespread Appraisal Fraud Puts Homeowners at Risk. The introduction to the paper, written by David Callahan says in part: While many U.S. households have benefited from the recent rise in real estate prices,...
04/25/2005
News/Resource
David Callahan, author of "The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans Are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead," chronicles rising numbers of people - not just in business - willing to cheat on their taxes, embellish resumes or lie to their auto insurance company about a claim.   "Americans who wouldn't so...
04/17/2005
News/Resource
"It's a shameful sign of our times," said David Callahan, research director at the public policy group Demos in New York, and Tim Doyle, director in government affairs for the Mortgage Bankers Association. "This is just another area in American life where a boom, with all its money to be made,...
04/17/2005
News/Resource
Forget the flu. From Wall Street to Main Street, from academia to the locker room, America's greatest epidemic may be cheating.   David Callahan, author of The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans Are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead, detects "a pattern of widespread cheating throughout U.S. society...
01/05/2005
News/Resource
Has the nation's infatuation with the free market warped the true meaning of American freedom by its emphasis on the self-serving individual in a "looking out for Number One" world? Freedom is America's most treasured value. In Freedom Reclaimed, Distinguished Senior Fellow John E. Schwarz examines...
10/27/2004
Publication
Your next-door neighbor offers to hook you up with free cable television. Or, when you unexpectedly owe hundreds of dollars in taxes, your accountant advises you to make up deductions, since "the IRS doesn't audit anyone." Do you do it? David Callahan thinks many of us would. And we wouldn't be...
01/01/2004
Publication
David Callahan explains to Salon.com's Heather Havrilesky why Americans lie more now than they did in the '50s, '60s or '70s. "I think that the gap between expectations and realities is enough to make people feel as though the social contract that's been promised to them hasn't delivered, which can...
12/22/2003
News/Resource
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