Super PACs

Our analysis of FEC data through June 30, 2012 shows that Super PACs continue to raise the majority of their funds from wealthy individuals, a significant amount of money from for-profit businesses, and a small amount of “secret” funds that cannot be traced back to an original source.   
08/01/2012
Data Byte
Of all money Super PACs raised from individuals in the 2012 cycle, 94.1 percent came in contributions of at least $10,000— from just 1082 individuals, or 0.00035 percent of the American population. More than half (57.1 percent) of individual Super PAC money came from just...
08/01/2012
Data Byte
The percentage of Super PAC funds coming from for- profit businesses is down for the 2012 cycle compared with all Super PAC fundraising through the end of 2011 (when it was 17 percent). This is due in part to increased individual contributions to Super PACs and in part to businesses giving...
08/01/2012
Data Byte
Most secret spending in this election has not flowed through Super PACs.  While there was considerable initial concern that Super PACs were setting up non-profit arms in order to funnel money to themselves while hiding the identity of their donors, it turns out that non-profits have tended to...
08/01/2012
Data Byte
Vice President Heather McGhee talked with guest host Luke Russert about the outsized role of a few individuals in funding the 2012 campaign.
07/27/2012
Video
Forget those jumbo checks Sheldon Adelson wrote for Newt Gingrich in the GOP primary, or even the big money that Romney is pulling in now from wealthy bundlers. The most dramatic illustration of how private wealth is perverting elections can be found in Ohio, where Senator Sherrod Brown is being...
06/22/2012
Blog
If you’re visiting a candidate this summer and looking for a thoughtful house gift, might we suggest a nice Super PAC? Thanks to the Supreme Court and Citizens United, they’re all the rage among the mega-wealthy. All it takes is a little paperwork and a wad of cash and presto, you can have, as The...
06/13/2012
News/Resource
Tuesday's New York Times editorial on the Chamber of Commerce's clandestine intrusion into American politics didn't go far enough in explaining why hiding the identities of donors to political ads is harmful to our democracy. The editorial was, on the one hand, too concerned that the secrecy...
06/01/2012
Blog
There is a terrible beauty in how America's constitutional system seems designed to stop big changes from ever happening -- or, more specifically, stops the majority of ordinary people from ever getting their hands on real power. Different choke points emerge at different historical moments to...
05/31/2012
Blog
Speaking in Arkansas last night shortly after President Obama awarded him the Medal of Freedom, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens addressed the controversial Citizens United decision.   Stevens dissented vigorously in the case, so his continued critique is not surprising. More...
05/31/2012
Blog
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