Gross Domestic Product

Some things did grow faster than the economy. While GDP doubled, the incarceration rate tripled.   
01/25/2012
Data Byte
The Index of Social Health (developed by the Institute for Innovation in Social Policy at Vassar College) calculates a composite rate of social health based on more than fifteen trends, including infant mortality, child abuse, child poverty, teenage suicide, high school dropout rates, homicides,...
01/25/2012
Data Byte
The child poverty rate today is actually 8 points higher than in 1969.   
01/25/2012
Data Byte
After steep declines in the 1960s, we’ve made little progress in reducing poverty. Today roughly 15 percent of Americans live below the poverty line, the same as in 1968.  
01/25/2012
Data Byte
Across the last thirty years of steady GDP growth, essentially half of the working age population had no pension coverage beyond Social Security. After a steep decline in the 2000s, the pension coverage rate was approximately 45 percent in 2010, the lowest level since 1988 and 6 percent lower than...
01/25/2012
Data Byte
Family income has grown modestly in recent decades, but mainly due to working more, not higher wages—an average of roughly 700 more annual work hours per household in 2000 compared to 1975, and still roughly 500 more in 2009, even with the financial crisis and downturn of that period. This...
01/25/2012
Data Byte
Over the last 30 years, personal income lagged far behind GDP growth, and the gap between them grew steadily. GDP per capita—the amount of income potentially available for every person—more than doubled, while actual income gains were much smaller.    
01/25/2012
Data Byte
01/25/2012
Data Byte
01/25/2012
Data Byte
Syndicate content